Local democracy during coronavirus

During coronavirus, we've made some changes to how we're running council meetings. See our coronavirus updates for more information on meetings and decisions.

Agenda and minutes

Venue: Remote Meeting

Contact: Joseph Kennally  Democracy Officer

Items
No. Item

52.

Declarations of Interest

At this point in the meeting, Board Members are asked to declare:

 

·        any personal interests not included on the Register of Interests

·        any prejudicial interests or

·        any disclosable pecuniary interests

 

which they may have in respect of business on this agenda.

Minutes:

Board Members were invited to declare any personal, prejudicial

or disclosable pecuniary interests, other than their standing

interests, that they had in relation to the business on the

agenda. None were declared.

53.

Minutes pdf icon PDF 161 KB

To approve and sign the minutes of the last meeting of the Health and Wellbeing Board held on Wednesday 21 July 2021.

Minutes:

The Chair gave several updates:

·        The 20 year strategy for health inequalities was still in progress under the Director for Public Health, and could be an addition to the Joint Health and Wellbeing Strategy, although this had not been decided.

·        There was a move to establish a new children’s partnership focused around the Health and Wellbeing Board’s aspirations. This was being worked on by the Health and Wellbeing Partnerships Coordinator and the Executive Member for Children, Young People and Education.

·        A meeting on co-production and listening was held between the Health and Wellbeing Partnerships Coordinator and the Manager, Healthwatch York, which will feed into the York Health and Care Alliance and Integrated Care System with the involvement of the Project Manager & Lead for Patient Equality & Diversity at York and Scarborough Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust.

·        A report on the Better Care Fund was to come to the Health and Wellbeing Board in November.

 

Resolved: That the minutes of the last meeting of the Health and Wellbeing Board held on 21 July 2021 be approved and signed by the Chair.

 

54.

Public Participation

At this point in the meeting members of the public who have

registered to speak can do so. Members of the public may speak

on agenda items or on matters within the remit of the committee.

Please note that our registration deadlines have changed to 2

working days before the meeting, in order to facilitate the

management of public participation at remote meetings. The

deadline for registering at this meeting is at 5.00pm on Monday

13 September 2021.

 

To register to speak please visit

http://www.york.gov.uk/AttendCouncilMeetings to fill out an online

registration form. If you have any questions about the registration

form or the meeting please contact the Democracy Officer for the

meeting whose details can be found at the foot of the agenda.

 

Webcasting of Remote Public Meetings

Please note that, subject to available resources, this remote

public meeting will be webcast including any registered public

speakers who have given their permission.

 

The remote public meeting can be viewed live and on demand at

www.york.gov.uk/webcasts. During coronavirus, we've made

some changes to how we're running council meetings. See our

coronavirus updates (www.york.gov.uk/COVIDDemocracy) for

more information on meetings and decisions.

Minutes:

It was reported that there were no registrations to speak under the Council’s Public Participation Scheme.

55.

The Future Direction of York Early Years Partnership's Collaboration with Nesta pdf icon PDF 470 KB

York’s early years partnership, the Early Years Improvement Board, is entering into a 3 – 5 year innovation collaboration with Nesta, led by City of York Council. The aim of this partnership is to work across the early years system to find ways in which to address the inequalities that exist in our communities and start from the earliest years of children’s lives.

In order to maximise this opportunity this paper is asking the Health and Wellbeing Board - who hold collective responsibility for improving outcomes in the early years - to consider how they can best support the partnership with a particular focus on governance arrangements in relation to the Early Years Improvement Board.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

York’s early years partnership, the Early Years Improvement Board, was entering into a 3 – 5 year innovation collaboration with Nesta, led by City of York Council. The aim of this partnership was to work across the early years system to find ways in which to address the inequalities that exist in our communities and start from the earliest years of children’s lives.

 

In order to maximise this opportunity the Board received a paper which asked them to consider how they can best support the partnership with a particular focus on governance arrangements in relation to the Early Years Improvement Board. The Head of Education Support Services and the Social Mobility Project Manager were in attendance to present the report and respond to questions.

 

Key points raised during the presentation of the report included:

·        Headline outcomes in York for early years aged children (those aged 0-5) were broadly positive, however the inequality gap between children was large in the first years of their lives.

·        Lifelong consequences of poor outcomes in early years were well documented, e.g. the Good Level of Development gap between disadvantaged and non-disadvantaged children in York was the largest in the country in 2017, and had remained persistently large. It was thought likely that the Coivd-19 pandemic would exacerbate this.

·        Nesta were an innovation organisation set up by a National Lottery endowment, with a focus on improving outcomes for early years children from disadvantaged backgrounds. Nesta provided significant additional capacity and some funding to the partnership.

·        A trial partnership with Nesta had been undertaken over 4 months to test compatibility and deliver a small project together.

·        There were 4 options listed in the report which officers recommended the Board accept in order to maximise the effectiveness of the partnership opportunity. These were:

i.             Strengthening governance of early years partnership arrangements.

ii.            Clarifying the early years outcomes that sit underneath the strategic ambitions of the Health and Wellbeing Board strategy around starting and growing well.

iii.          Championing the importance of early years as a shared priority for all.

iv.          Commissioning an early years specific Joint Strategic Needs Assessment (JSNA).

 

·        The first option was recommended by the Early Years Peer Review, which was carried out in October 2020. The proposal was for a clear line of accountability from the Early Years Improvement Board to the Health and Wellbeing Board, with the suggestion that the reports would be received at least twice yearly.

·        The second option on outcomes referred to the period after the expiration of the current Health and Wellbeing Board strategy in 2022. Nutrition, immunisation, maternal mental health and speech and language were suggested as key priorities relating to early years for the next stage of the strategy.

·        As a priority for the Health and Wellbeing Board, the third option was about how to translate the championing of the importance of early year’s into partner’s organisational priorities. It was also about challenging the perception that early years was only the responsibility of education or health services and  ...  view the full minutes text for item 55.

56.

Healthwatch York Report: Dentistry pdf icon PDF 258 KB

This report is for information, sharing a report from Healthwatch York about the availability of NHS Dentistry in our city.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Board considered a report for information from Healthwatch York about the availability of NHS Dentistry in the city. The Manager, Healthwatch York was in attendance to present the report and respond to questions.

 

Key points raised during the presentation of the report included:

·        People seeking NHS Dentistry services are the most common calls Healthwatch York received.

·        Healthwatch York undertook a 2 month consultation with local dentists, from which they determined that it was not possible for people to find an NHS dentist in the city.

·        It was believed that the creation of integrated care systems provided an opportunity for creating a strong voice of healthcare professionals to lobby for change of dental contract commissioning at national level.

·        Oral health should be linked to other key issues through the integrated care systems, such as weight management, smoking cessation, cancer awareness/detection, mental wellbeing and self-confidence.

·        The four areas for action detailed in the report:

a.   Rapid and radical reform of the way dentistry is commissioned and provided.

b.   Tackling the twin crises of access and affordability, with particular emphasis on addressing health inequalities

c.   Improving the clarity of information about NHS dentistry

d.   Consideration of the role of dentistry to support people’s overall health, harnessing opportunities such as the integration of health and care through Integrated Care Systems arrangements, to link oral health to other key issues such as weight management, smoking cessation, cancer awareness and detection, and mental wellbeing.

 

Key points raised by Board members included:

·        That it was especially worrying that children were unable to access dentistry.

·        Dentistry has been a priority of City of York Council for a number of years, for example the creation of an Oral Health Improvement Group to work on an Oral Health Improvement Strategy which was led by Public Health and chaired by a local dentist. This work was put on hold as a result of the pandemic but was being relaunched.

·        City of York Council’s Health and Adult Social Care Policy and Scrutiny Committee had been examining dental care as an area of concern for some years, and had decided to look at the issue in more detail at the January 2022 meeting, with the dental commissioner for NHS England and Chair of the Oral Health Improvement Group were to be invited to these discussions.

·        Despite attempts to improve dentistry service in the city, it was acknowledged that the issue could not be resolved locally. Lobbying the Chief Dental Officer, Government and MPs was one way of raising awareness of the issue.

·        Between March and June 2020, the NHS dental service was only for urgent cases, with phased re-opening of the service thereafter; it was reported that the service was operating at 60% capacity in September 2021.

·        The ability for dentistry to meet local needs was hampered by the fact that it was commissioned by national contract.

·        Health inequalities, especially for those with mental health issues and learning disabilities were being exacerbated by the lack of NHS dental services.

·        A consequence of  ...  view the full minutes text for item 56.

57.

Current Situation re: Covid-19 and Covid Recovery pdf icon PDF 1 MB

The Director of Public Health will give a presentation on the

current situation in relation to Covid-19 including recovery plans.

This item will be in presentation format to ensure that the most up

to date information can be presented to the Health and Wellbeing

Board.

Minutes:

The Board received a presentation on the current situation in relation to Covid-19 including recovery plans. This item was in presentation format to ensure that the most up to date information could be present to the Board. The Director of Public Health was in attendance to present and respond questions.

 

Key points raised during the presentation included:

·        York had the lowest rate of Covid-19 cases in the Yorkshire and Humber region for the period 5/9/21 to 11/9/21, and was also below the national average rate.

·        However, there were consistently more than 400 new cases of Covid per week in the city, a rate which previously would have caused the imposition of a lockdown.

·        It was important not to become complacent around Covid, as even though fewer people would be hospitalised, isolation was still legally mandated to isolate, having knock-on effects throughout society such as work absences and relatives having to care for those infected. A significant proportion would also develop Long Covid.

·        The highest proportion of cases were in the 10-14 and 15-19 age groups, which was consistent across the whole of the UK. This was likely due to vaccinations only recently been available to 16-17 year olds and the rollout had not yet been extended to 12-15 year olds.

·        There were also cases across all age groups, with relatively high rates amongst the 45-49 age group.

·        As of 15/9/21 there were 40 people in York hospitals with Covid-19 and as of 10/9/21 4 people in the intensive care unit. There had been a steady increase in hospital admissions in previous months, and they were expected to increase further into winter.

·        There were some deaths due to Covid, but far fewer than at earlier stages of the pandemic, which was attributable to the effects of the vaccination programme.

·        As of 26/8/21, there were 6 care homes with a confirmed Covid-19 infection of at least 1 staff member or resident. 1 care home had experienced an outbreak of 2 or more cases on 8/9/21.

·        In the 7 days up to 13.9.21 there were 127 children of primary or secondary school age that had tested positive across 26 schools. These cases were expected to increase as a result of these outbreaks.

·        63% of 16-17 year olds had received their first vaccination, and 7% had received their second. These figures were expected to rapidly increase.

·        Since contract tracing services were taken over by local authorities, cases completed in York had consistently been above 90%.

 

Comments from Board members included:

·        Enhanced booster doses of the vaccination, as well as co-administration with the winter flu jab were taking place.

·        A total of c.150,000 individuals had received their first vaccination, which was around82.4%, with second doses at 76%. The target was 90% which had been achieved for several age brackets.

·        The ward with the lowest vaccine take-up was Hull Road, at 63% for first doses.

·        Pop-up clinic locations were being made more flexible to address accessibility issues. Information leaflet drops were also ongoing to those who  ...  view the full minutes text for item 57.

58.

Understanding Long COVID and the Impact of Long Covid on York's Residents and on Health Inequalities pdf icon PDF 269 KB

The Chair of the York Health and Care Collaborative and the Consultant in Public Health, NHS Vale of York Clinical Commissioning Group will give a presentation on the effects of Long Covid on York residents and health inequalities.

Minutes:

The Chair of the York Health and Care Collaborative and the Consultant in Public Health, NHS Vale of York Clinical Commissioning Group gave a presentation on the effects of Long Covid on York residents and health inequalities.

 

Key points raised in the presentation included:

·        Long Covid had a vast array of symptoms, and affected about 10% of the population who had been infected with Covid-19.

·        Vaccination reduced the risk of developing Long Covid by about 50%, and paediatric cases were likely to be lower, at around 1 in 20 cases.

·        Risk factors/the relation to the acuteness of original infection and the full range of effective treatments were not known. Effective diagnostic tests had not been created but were in development.

·        There were 970,000 people living with Long Covid in the UK in August 2021, which equated to around 3,000 in the City of York.

·        There were three Long Covid multidisciplinary assessment services in operation across North Yorkshire and York.

·        Patients were assessed by GPs and referred, with a local screening tool being developed.

·        Treatment options for Long Covid included consultant led care for complex cases, occupational therapy, physiotherapy and optimising health through leading a healthy lifestyle.

·        Humber, Coast and Vale’s one paediatric Long Covid assessment service was based in Hull University Teaching Hospitals, reflecting the expertise there and the low prevalence of such cases.

 

Comments from Board Members included:

 

·        There was a collaboration between Nimbus and York Centre for Voluntary Service to support patients with Covid, and part of their work had been to raise awareness of Long Covid symptoms and the nature of the illness.

·        Increased vaccine take-up would greatly reduce the effects of Long Covid, on patients as well as family, friends and healthcare services.

·        Funding for Long Covid services was only in place until March 2022 and would need to be extended to ensure that the condition can be properly understood and would be a critical factor in determining how long vaccination booster programmes would go on for.

·        It was important to maintain the emphasis on wearing masks and washing hands as a means of reducing the spread of Covid.

 

Resolved:

i.             That the contents of the update be noted.

 

Reason: To enable to Health and Wellbeing Board to understand the impact of Long Covid.

 

[Dr Broughton left the meeting at 5:48]

 

59.

Update from the York Health and Care Alliance pdf icon PDF 465 KB

The Board will consider a report which provides an update on the progress of the York Health and Care Alliance, including minutes of recent Alliance meetings for Board members to note.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Board considered a report which provided an update on the progress of the York Health and Care Alliance, including minutes of recent Alliance meetings for Board members to note. The Joint Consultant in Public Health, NHS Vale of York CCG and City of York Council was in attendance to present the report and respond to questions.

 

Key points raised in the presentation of the report included:

·        That the paper was similar to the one presented to the July meeting of the Board.

·        There was an evolving transition in the Alliance as the Integrated Care System in Humber Coast and Vale is established in April 2022 and Clinical Commissioning Groups are disestablished.

·        An integrated care board constitution had been developed, with accompanying policy documents. A Human Resources framework for transitioning staff had also been released.

·        Thriving Places, a policy around place-based partnerships such as the York Health and Care Alliance, should operate was developed. There were a range of options and a certain amount of local flexibility for how place-based partnerships should operate.

·         The Maturity Matrix allowed healthcare professionals to determine where the service was doing well or otherwise on integrated care, health inequalities, clinical/professional leadership and citizen engagement.

 

The Chair stated that this was a developing area and requested that this item be considered at each meeting of the Health and Wellbeing Board until the transition was complete.

 

Resolved:

i.             That the update on the NHS reforms and work of the York Health and Care Alliance be noted.

ii.            That the minutes of the York Health and Care Alliance be received and noted.

 

Reason: To allow the Health and Wellbeing Board to remain informed about the York Health and Cara Alliance and NHS reforms.

 

 

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